Drug Use

How we can help

Substance use depends on levels as to how we can help. If you or someone you know is ready to make a change and is trying to keep clean then we can work with them. We won’t see anyone who is intoxicated as the drug will get in the way of communication. Please contact us for further details.

 

The number of  drug users recovering from addiction has risen significantly in the last year, according to the latest official statistics for England released recently  by the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse. This reflects the government’s Drug Strategy goal to enable more people to recover from addiction to illegal drugs.

The annual figures also confirm another sharp decline in the number of young adults under 30 needing treatment for addiction to the most problematic drugs. Overall the numbers accessing treatment for all drugs have fallen for the second year running.

The figures are analysed in an NTA report, Drug treatment and recovery 2010-11 (http://www NULL.nta NULL.nhs NULL.uk/drug-treatment-and-recovery-2010-11 NULL.aspx), which also includes a new analysis of drug treatment trends over the last six years. It shows:

  • A jump in the number of people recovering from addiction: 27,969 this year compared to 23,680 last year, an annual increase of 18% (and a 150% increase since 2005/06).
  • Of the 255,556 unique individuals who entered a treatment programme since April 2005 for the first time, 71,887 (28%) successfully completed and did not need further treatment.
  • The more recently someone came into treatment, the more likely they are to succeed in tackling dependency.
  • A fall in the number of people needing treatment for addiction to illegal drugs, including a reduction of almost 10,000 in the number of heroin and crack users coming into treatment in just two years.

“Addiction remains a serious problem for many communities, and we need to remain vigilant, particularly in a tough economic climate. But the figures show that recovery is now becoming a reality for more individuals each year.”

There is no such thing as a typical substance user. People with substance problems come from all walks of life and different backgrounds. Effective treatment is available by coming to see us. Substance use doesn’t just affect the user, it affects their families and loved ones too, we can look at family therapy and separate therapy for family members and carers. Group therapy is also effetive for alcohol and drug users.

HARM MINIMISATION GUIDELINES

The way a drug affects the  person who has taken it depends as much upon the psychological characteristics,  personality and mood of the individual (and their social context) as  upon the chemical properties of the drug itself. The notion that specific drugs  have fixed and predictable effects (which are the same from person to person) remains extremely widespread,  but is in fact not the case. The generalised confusion about which drug  category some substances actually fit in to reflects this. However, current  understanding identifies the following categories and effects:

Depressants: substances that depress the activity of the Central Nervous System and produce an altered state of consciousness. They include: alcohol; benzodiazepines (including Valium ®); GHB/L; barbiturates; solvents.

Depending on dose, common effects include elevated mood, relaxation, loss of inhibitions, uncontrolled behaviour, slowed breathing and reactions, reduced heart rate, eventual sedation.

Analgesics: substances that suppress psychological distress, physical and/or emotional pain and produce an altered state of consciousness, and include: opium, morphine, heroin and codeine; paracetemol and aspirin can also be included here, as can ketamine and cannabis.

Depending on dose, common effects include euphoria, detachment, and relief from negative stimuli, slowed heart rate and breathing, drowsiness.

Stimulants: substances that stimulate the activity of the Central Nervous System and produce an altered state of consciousness, and include: cocaine/crack; amphetamines (speed); ecstasy; mephedrone (‘meow’): tobacco; crystal methamphetamine (ice); BZP; caffeine and ephedrine.

Depending on dose, common effects include increased heart rate and energy, changes in self-awareness, suppressed appetite, euphoria, confidence, talkativeness and sociability.

Hallucinogens (psychedelics): substances that dramatically alter perception, sensory experience and states of consciousness, and include LSD (acid), magic mushrooms, ecstasy, ketamine (Special K), cannabis; and solvents.

Depending on dose, common effects include relaxation, changes in self-awareness, mood and cognitive functioning, dramatically altered sense of time and space, euphoria, alterations to visual and auditory sensory input.

 

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